Circle Dancing at The Abbey -Free Taster session

Begins 27 Feb 2017 07:30 PM - Ends 27 Feb 2017 09:00 PM

CIRCLE DANCING AT THE ABBEY

We hold a monthly class, each second Monday of the month and invite you to join us at the Abbey for Circle Dancing to beautiful music from around the world.

We’d like to extend a warm welcome to newcomers, and so are offering a FREE taster session on Monday, 27th February from 7.30 – 9.00 pm.  All we would ask is for a small donation to contribute towards the cost of heating.

What is Circle Dancing?

The circle is an ancient, universal symbol of wholeness and unity, and Circle Dancing has its roots in the community dance of many cultures. Each person joins the circle as an individual but, through the dance, becomes connected with other participants and the still centre around which the circle moves.  The important thing is participation.

As well as traditional dances, whose origins are lost in the mists of time, new dances are being created and new music written for them. The repertoire is constantly increasing, so a typical circle dance session might include dances from Greece, Israel, Russia, France, as well as recently choreographed ones. Their varied origins deepen an awareness of our shared world, and some people refer to this type of dance as ‘World Dance’.

The patterns of the dances reflect the cycles and rhythms we all experience in life. Some are solemn, some exciting, some light-hearted; some are very lively, some complex and some simple; some can lead us into stillness and reflection.

The modern circle dance movement arose out of the work of Bernard Wosein, a German ballet master and choreographer, who was also drawn to Slavonic culture and folk dance. He travelled widely in the Balkan region, where the old ‘round dances’ were still kept alive. He was struck by the sacred quality and symbolism that their ancient steps and rhythms expressed. Learning them and sharing them with others also inspired him to develop his own choreographies in the spirit of the traditional dances. Bernard Wosein then introduced Circle Dance to the UK at Findhorn in 1976. Since then many groups with regular meetings have developed here and around the world.

The aim of circle dancing is to create a sense of well-being, wholeness and community. Indeed, recent research from Oxford University has shown that such dancing benefits health, boosts the body’s ‘feel good’ endorphins, and increases feelings of social connectedness. So it’s official: dancing together is good for you!

No partner is needed – just bring yourself and a comfortable pair of shoes. Absolute beginners are welcome too, because the dances are simple, and are taught and walked through first. There’s no need to book in advance, but if you’d like

further information, you’re welcome to contact: Elizabeth Mitchell, 01865 806791 emwym@hotmail.co.uk,